REPEAT THE PATTERN

MY international subscription to Selvedge is a luxury – one that will most certainly go if I, or my partner, lose our jobs – a possibilit...



MY international subscription to Selvedge is a luxury – one that will most certainly go if I, or my partner, lose our jobs – a possibility in this current economic climate.

When I read Polly Leonard’s editorial in the “Frugal” edition I was nodding my head over my morning cuppa. Leonard references the Boy Scout and Girl Guide motto - Be Prepared - and reminds readers that care for one’s possessions is by no means new, but may have been forgotten in a culture of cheap and cheerful, almost disposable, chain store options.

My mother was taught to sew by her mother, and in turn taught me. I can mend and hem clothing and launder and care for my wardrobe with its longevity in mind. My stepdaughter recently handed me a blouse I repaired not long after its purchase and is in need of mending once more. This time, however, I am not going to fix it. The item was cheap and nasty to begin with, and more than that, she didn’t follow the care instructions, nor cared for the item enough to even hang it in her wardrobe. While I could show her how to mend it herself, I know she’d rather fork out more cash for a replacement piece than take the time to make the repairs herself and continue to launder it carefully.

The "Frugal" edition of Selvedge advocated for a return to mending and making do, with an emphasis on refashioning clothing and caring for classic pieces. That old adage of a stitch in time saves nine, is so very true

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7 comments

  1. Yes I know what you mean...my granmother was a sewer, ditto my mum and so am I...and it's so handy for repairs as well...but my daughter has no interest and like your would be more inclined to discard the garment - it is a different world tho with so many 'cheap' clothes being produced in China and India today...but I can't imagine not being interested in putting a hem up or repairing a seam...

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  2. I'm lucky enough to be able to read Selvidge at work through the subscription a group of Design teachers have. I can mend but I can't make a garment from scratch. I'm not good with sorting the whites from coloureds in the wash either.

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  3. Am pretty good at sorting my washing but you have just prompted a reminder of the niggle at the back of my head - off to mend!

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  4. I haven't seen this mag before. I will have to do a little research on it. I am with you on everything above. Everyday thoughtless consumption makes me feel ill. When I pick up goods second hand I often marvel at how well made and preserved those item are. How is it a dress from the 60's can still be in better than a new one bought recently and only washed a few times. It's such a terrible feeling also when you do fork out a lot of money for what you thought was quality and turns out to be cheap and nasty. Yes, our parents and grandparents were onto a good thing.

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  5. I wish I knew how to sew! I would for sure repair some of my own pieces rather than take them to the cleaners or the seamstress! I wonder if you can take a sewing class???

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  6. A friend of mine was only telling me yesterday she has a fear of buttons only because lately hers have been falling off, my reaction, sew them back on! I thought everyone knew how to sew a button on?

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  7. sounds like a great mag. sewing is such a useful skill, i am in the process of learning and particularly loving altering all the op shop pieces in my wardrobe. so satisfying

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